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Into Film Young Reviewer, Cai, Reviews Showdown
Into Film Young Reviewer, Cai attends the premiere of Showdown at Cinema & Co., Swansea and lets us know his thoughts.

Cai says – ‘Showdown tells the story of Sam, a young autistic boy, with a passion for Western films, who must decide whether to stand down or stay his ground when a showdown presents itself. To demonstrate the main character’s autism, the sound is used perfectly and practically to signal when Sam is experiencing sensory overload, with the shaky camera adding to this depiction of his autism. The camera is also used well by the filmmakers to emphasise Sam’s isolation through far away wide shots that distance him from the viewer. I was impressed by the way in which the film uses a handheld camera, adding to the film’s sense of realism.  The film’s close-up shots aid in immersing the audience in the story of the film by giving us the best view of the subtleties of the actors’ performances. 

The film’s focus on an autistic character is a refreshing perspective that is brought to life by the young actor, Charlie Lock. His performance is incredible, he captures an autistic character through no dialogue, relying only on facial expressions. Another performance that shines is Sam’s Dad, who captures the parental perspective on autism; ranging from frustration to acceptance. These performances enhance the sweet story, that appeals to both young and older audiences. Younger audiences can connect with Sam’s perspective, whilst older audiences will connect with Sam’s parents.

Showdown is set in the small Welsh town of Bedlinog, a setting which perfectly demonstrates the idyllic aspect of the Welsh countryside. I also love the emotionally raw aspect of the story, as the town is very close to the writer’s heart, having grown up there. Bedlinog also fits the film’s western colour palette and aids in enhancing the film’s western iconography.

One of my favourite aspects of the film was it’s ‘proud to be indie’ feel, it all felt very homegrown. My only critique of Showdown was the pace of the editing which really makes the film go by all too fast leaving me desiring more.’

To find out more about the film and how to book, click here.
Find out more about the Into Film Young Reporter Programme.

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BFI unveils full programme for BFI MUSICALS! THE GREATEST SHOW ON SCREEN

BFI unveils full programme for BFI MUSICALS! THE GREATEST SHOW ON SCREEN Including BFI UK-wide re-releases of Tommy, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and in the Rain across the UK from Oct 19 Jan 20.

 

On Tuesday (10th September), the BFI revealed the programme for the UK’s greatest ever season celebrating the film musical, at an all-singing, all-dancing event at BFI Southbank with special guests including actors Petula Clark and Clarke Peters and

Patricia Ward Kelly, wife and biographer of Hollywood legend Gene Kelly. BFI Musicals will celebrate the greatest stars including Gene Kelly, Barbra Streisand, Judy Garland and Doris Day, and spotlight the directors and composers whose creativity was the driving force behind countless beloved musicals; from the virtuoso choreographer and director Bob Fosse (Cabaret, Sweet Charity) to the late great composer Michel Legrand (Yentl, Les demoiselles de Rochefort). The programme will also shine a light on the musicals which engage with socio-political themes, such as racism or the horrors of the Depression, as well as celebrate the films which provide audiences with escapism from political uncertainty and troubled times; from the Golden Age of Hollywood’s box office boom during WW2 and in the post-war years, to the phenomenal successes of the latest musical films like The Lion King (Jon Favreau, 2019), which has already surpassed $1.5 billion globally. From singalong screenings to Q&As and immersive events for the whole family, BFI Musicals is guaranteed to have the UK singing and dancing in the aisles this autumn.

Head Curator of the BFI National Archive, and BFI Musicals Programmer Robin Baker tonight revealed that the programme would span the length and breadth of the UK, with nationwide re-releases of Ken Russell’s rock opera Tommy (1975), starring Roger Daltrey, Ann-Margret, Elton John, Oliver Reed and Tina Turner, and of Jacques Demy’s Palme d’Or-winning The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) starring Catherine Deneuve and Nino Castelnuovo. Alongside the previously announced BFI re-release of Singin’ in the Rain (Gene Kelly, Stanley Donen, 1952), these re-releases will screen at venues across the UK, alongside a touring programme of 12 musicals presented by the ICO (Independent Cinema Office) and a major series of special events programmed in partnership with the BFI Film Audience Network (BFI FAN). Highlights of the UK-wide BFI FAN programme will include the Wizard of Oz(Victor Fleming, 1939) in Belfast Cathedral; an immersive screening of Brigadoon (Vincente Minnelli, 1954) in Edinburgh; Reframing Streisand, a UK-wide film tour celebrating the iconic star; a series of aquatic themed musicals in and around Belfast harbour; and a Russian musicals season in London, Bristol and Nottingham. The full UK-wide programme will be revealed soon.

Special guests from the world of film, TV and musical theatre will take part in events throughout the season, with full line-ups being announced by individual cinemas soon. Guests confirmed for BFI Southbank so far include:

  • Imelda Staunton (Theatre: Gypsy, Follies, Sweeney Todd, The Wizard of Oz)
  • Patricia Ward Kelly (Wife and biographer of Hollywood legend Gene Kelly)
  • Clarke Peters (Theatre: Five Guys Named Moe (writer), Guys and Dolls (actor), TV: The Wire)
  • Kerry Ellis (Theatre: Wicked, We Will Rock You)
  • Howard Schuman (TV: Rock Follies)

While the movie musical never truly went away, the last few years have seen a major resurgence in the popularity of the genre, with La La Land (Damien Chazelle, 2016), The Greatest Showman (Michael Gracey, 2017) and Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again (Ol Parker, 2018) taking a combined global box office of more than $1.25 billion, emulating the Golden Age of Hollywood, when MGM musicals ruled the box office. Meanwhile, Rupert Goold’s forthcoming biopic Judy (2019) starring Renée Zellweger as Judy Garland, and TV series Fosse/Verdon, which immortalises director and master choreographer Bob Fosse and Tony Award-winning actor and dancer Gwen Verdon also point to a renewed interest in the life and work of musical icons. As well as the recent success of the movie musical, theatre audiences continue to lap up musicals on stage, with revenue from the genre in London’s West End increasing year on year by 15.4% in 2018 to just shy of £504 million. With stage successes being regularly developed into feature films – such as Tom Hooper’s much talked-about Cats (2019) and next year’s adaptations of Lin Manuel Miranda’s In The Heights and British hit Everyone’s Talking About Jamie – it’s clear that the movie musical is here to stay.

BFI Musicals will explore the reasons for the current success of the movie musical, including the notion that it is the best form of escapism from the troubled times we are living in. The season will celebrate the greatest stars, directors, composers and choreographers, and look at the stories of the Hollywood, British and international musical. The season will also look to confirm the musical as a genre which, hidden beneath the glitz and glamour, speaks to audiences
about profoundly serious subjects, from the hardship of the Depression and the insidiousness of racism to the fight for LGBTQ+ rights.

Robin Baker, Head Curator, BFI National Archive and BFI Musicals Programmer said:

 “Welcome to the new golden age of the movie musical. Audiences flock to musicals in troubled times – from Busby Berkeley’s spectacular routines during the Depression to the masterpieces of MGM’s Freed Unit during WW2 – so it’s no surprise that the big screen musical is currently enjoying a major revival. We’re delighted to be bringing both classic musicals and rarities to cinemas across the UK in Britain’s biggest ever celebration of the musical. So, time to leave your woes behind and immerse yourself in the emotional, hairs-on-the-back-of-your-arms-raising joy brought to you on the big screen by Barbra Streisand, Gene Kelly, Doris Day, Bob Fosse, Judy Garland, Beyoncé and an all-singing, all-dancing cast of thousands.”

BFI MUSICALS THE GREATEST SHOW ON SCREEN will be in cinemas and venues across the UK from October 2019 to January 2020 and will celebrate the joyful, emotional, shared experience of watching film musicals; with the biggest stars, the most iconic scenes and the best-loved song and dance numbers on the big screen where they belong. BFI MUSICALS will include:

  • A major season at BFI Southbank, with screenings and one-off events, immersive venue takeovers, a pop-up piano musicals bar, quiz nights and much more
  • BFI UK-wide re-releases of Singin’ in the Rain (Gene Kelly, Stanley Donen, 1952), Tommy (Ken Russell, 1975) and The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (Jacques Demy, 1964)
  • Hundreds of screenings and events at venues across the UK programmed in partnership with the BFI Film Audience Network (BFI FAN) and the Independent Cinema Office (ICO); details to be announced in full soon.
  • BFI home entertainment releases of Yentl (Barbra Streisand, 1983) (Blu-ray), Hair (Miloš Forman, 1979) (Dual Format Edition) and Les demoiselles de Rochefort (Jacques Demy, 1967) (Blu-ray)
  • A major musical collection on the BFI’s VOD service BFI Player
  • 100 newly digitised musicals-themed TV programmes available to watch for free in the BFI Mediatheque at BFI Southbank
#BFIMusicals

Visit www.bfi.org.uk/musicals for more information and www.bfimusicals.co.uk for full UK-wide listings

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Dimensions partners with film industry to urge all UK cinemas to become autism friendly

02ND APRIL 2019 5 MINUTE READ

Dimensions, the national autism and learning disability support provider which pioneered autism friendly initiatives in cinemas nationwide, has ramped up their partnership with the UK Cinema Association and BFI Film Audience Network (FAN), supported by National Lottery funding, to develop free autism friendly training resources for all cinemas and cinema staff across the country.

The training, launched at the start of World Autism Awareness Month, was developed by people with autism and industry experts. In becoming ‘autism friendly’, cinema staff are trained on how to make small adjustments to the environment that create a welcoming and inclusive atmosphere for people with autism.

Autism friendly screenings are intended to open up cinemas and cinema-going to people with autism, and may help people with autism transition into attending traditional screenings.

The launch coincides with research from Dimensions highlighting the pivotal role of autism friendly screenings in helping people with autism feel valued and included in society.

Elements of a traditional cinema screening can discourage visits from people with autism, 80% of whom have felt excluded from their local community. Their top concerns include too much noise, having to sit through adverts and trailers, and worrying about being judged by others.

The training tackles this with guidance on how to make small adjustments, such as altering the volume and lighting levels. As a result, people who go to autism friendly screenings feel more valued and understood (33%) and more connected to their community (27%).

Crucially, breaking down barriers to inclusion and communication, four in ten people with autism (41%) say that autism friendly screenings give them a reason to leave the house.

Since Dimensions first launched its autism friendly cinemas initiative eight years ago, there have been over 400,000 visits to over 350 autism friendly cinema sites (out of over 1,000 cinema sites in the UK*).

Yet with a quarter of people with autism (24%) having never attended an autism friendly screening, there is an urgent need for more cinemas to participate to ensure this opportunity is available across the country.

Sarah Clarke, Campaign Manager at Dimensions, said:

“Most people don’t have to think twice about going to the cinema, but if you have autism it can be a stressful experience. With 80% having felt excluded from society, we know how important autism friendly environments are in tackling this issue.

“We’ve been campaigning for years for more autism friendly environments and we’ve seen first-hand how successful these initiatives can be. But there is still a lot of work to be done.

“We found that over 90% of people with autism would go to the cinema more if there were more autism friendly opportunities. With our new training, we’re calling on every cinema in the UK to become autism friendly, to ensure current and potential guests feel welcome and valued, and – in turn – help make society more inclusive.”

Lauren, 18, has autism and helped produce the training. She said:

“Film is a real passion of mine and I am proud to have helped develop this training with Dimensions. Autism friendly cinema screenings help people feel more relaxed and confident, so you can fully immerse yourself in the film without worrying about being judged.

“It also means so much to families and friends, who can relax and spend quality time together instead of feeling like they have to stay home. It’s so important that there are more autism friendly environments across the UK so everyone can benefit.”

Phil Clapp, Chief Executive of the UK Cinema Association, said:

“The positive response in recent years from audiences to autism friendly screenings has seen more and more UK cinemas look to offer these shows, with these becoming a regular feature of programming at many sites. At the same time, there is also increasing interest in offering a broader range of content, for example for older audiences.

“In partnership with Dimensions and the BFI Film Audience Network, the UK Cinema Association has over the last six months worked to create a written training guide and video for cinemas and their staff, all with the aim of helping to deliver even more high-quality autism friendly screenings for local communities and audiences.”

Toki Allison, BFI Film Audience Network Access Officer at Film Hub Wales, said:

“This has been a really important collaboration for us, as we are working to ensure that cinema is accessible to everyone. There is a space for many different types of cinema and its transformative power should be available to influence anyone who has an interest in seeing films, whatever their needs or behaviours. Many FAN members have been screening autism friendly screenings regularly for their communities and we’re keen to ensure this trend continues and grows.”

The initiative is part of a wider Dimensions campaign to create more autism friendly environments around the UK. Dimensions has also launched a range of free training resources for libraries, museums and Belong by GAME stores to encourage a widespread perception change and ensure more public spaces across the UK are autism friendly.

For more information and booking details, visit the Dimensions website.

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We want your Blogs!

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Film Hub Wales - Distributor Days
Distributor Slate Days 2019

Join us for the Distributor Slate Days 2019 to find out about upcoming theatrical releases, and to meet and connect with UK distributors.

Slate Presentations Day
Tuesday 17 September 2019, 10.00am to 8.00pm
Registration from 8.30am

A full day of presentations from distributors on their upcoming theatrical release slates and marketing plans, a networking lunch and an evening drinks reception.

Meet the Distributor Day
Wednesday 18 September 2019, 10.00am to 5.00pm
Organised in a speed dating style, the Meet the Distributor Day is a chance for exhibitors to have focused 1:1 meetings with distributors and key partners. A networking lunch will be provided.

This event is a joint presentation from Film Hub LondonFilm Hub Scotland and the BFI Film Audience Network, in partnership with Picturehouse Cinemas and MUBI GO, and supported by Motion Picture SolutionsOmnex,comScoreScreen InternationalFilmbankmediaEclair and usheru.

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Young FAN Reviews Wanted (Amy Collins)

 

Amy Collins joined Chapter Arts Centre for work experience and wrote this review for us of 2001: A Space Odyssey 50th Anniversary Release

2001: A space Odyssey was an interesting film and very different to the usual sci-fi film. It is based around a strange object, which is found on the moon and because of this object a group of people have to go to Jupiter.

The film doesn’t have a soundtrack and uses famous classical songs instead. This puts emphasis on the long atmospheric scenes, which wouldn’t fit or make sense in other movies. Despite the atmospheric scenes I felt that some of them went on a little bit long, but it did make you think about why a certain scene was there.

The movie ends on a bit of a cliff hanger and I felt like I left the cinema trying to figure out what happened at the end. This separates this movie from movies with a predictable plot and ending and keeps the person watching A Space Odyssey in suspense.

Overall I enjoyed this movie and would definitely recommend it despite its sometimes intricate plot.

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VACANCY: FAN Access Coordinator (Work Placement) August 2019 (CLOSED)
  • FAN Access Coordinator (Work Placement)
  • Fixed-term 24 hours per week for 24 weeks (September 2019 – March 2020)
  • Salary scale: £17,076 pro rata

Film Hub Wales (FHW) aims to bring more films, to more people, in more places around Wales. Along with its independent member venues, FHW regularly develops inventive ways for people in Wales to go to the cinema. FHW is one of nine UK wide ‘hubs’ funded by the British Film Institute (BFI) to form the Film Audience Network (FAN), with Chapter appointed as the Film Hub Lead Organisation (FHLO) in Wales. The aim is to develop the exhibition sector through dedicated research, training and audience development project support. Since Film Hub Wales set up in 2013, it’s supported over 160 exciting cinema projects, reaching over 302,000 audience members. Film Hub Wales are proud to act as the Lead Hub for Diversity and Inclusion for the UK BFI Film Audience Network.

Film Hub Wales are seeking candidates from diverse backgrounds to support the BFI FAN Access Officer with the coordination of the BFI Film Audience Network (FAN) Diversity and Inclusion project.
The post-holder will explore and debate representation on screen, in the audience and behind the camera, with the aim of creating access for all film audiences to British independent and world cinema UK wide, regardless of the barriers to attendance they may face. They will liaise with members of BFI FAN, to ensure the smooth day-to-day running of the project.

  • Application forms and job description available below, or contact apply@chapter.org
  • Closing deadline for applications: 5.30pm 12th August 2019
  • Interviews to be held: 20th August 2019

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What’s On in 2019: Welsh Cinemas Reflect Global Issues on Screen

What’s On In 2019
Welsh Cinemas Reflect Global Issues on Screen

Film Hub Wales (FHW), with Chapter as Hub Lead Organisation, are set to bring more fantastic films, to more people, in more places across Wales this year, through a series of new projects delivered by Welsh cinemas and film festivals.

Working in partnership with exhibitors across the nation, events will explore globally significant issues from climate change, to exclusion and discrimination.

The FHW audience development programme is designed to support innovative and adventurous cultural film programming Wales-wide, enabling exhibitors to make bold choices, bringing the very best British and international films to all audiences.

Hana Lewis, Strategic Manager or Film Hub Wales explains: 

“It’s an exciting time to visit your local cinema, or film festival, with cinema admissions at their highest since the 1970s1. As we become increasingly conscious of societal, political and even planetary changes, film offers a world of enlightening stories, right on our doorsteps. Thanks to our creative network of exhibitors in Wales, we’re able to launch our first programme of film events for 2019, where new voices will be heard, global issues explored and community spaces formed.”

The projects are supported by Film Hub Wales, part of the BFI Film Audience Network using funds from the National Lottery to ensure the greatest choice of cinema is available to everyone across the UK.

2019 Projects

South Wales  

Gentle / Radical  (June 2019 – March 2020)

Gentle/Radical ensure that the voices of those most marginalised, are heard through the presentation of powerful cinema. Going Deeper, Going Local is the first project to launch at their new base in Wyndham Street Community Hub, Riverside, Cardiff. Reaching out to minority ethnic audiences encompassing BAME women, BAME elders, BAME youth in both hyper-localised settings and across Cardiff, the project will explore how audiences are impacted by issues such as climate change, migration, colonialism, patriarchy and other experiences of exclusion and discrimination.

Formed in 2017, Gentle/Radical is a grassroots cultural organisation and platform for radical thinking, creative practice and social change. They are currently running an online fundraiser to house their new cultural and community hub:  localgiving.org/appeal/gentle-radical-wyndham-centre/

twitter.com/gentle_hq 

www.facebook.com/gentleradical/ 

gentleradical.org  

North Wales  

Off Y Grid  (May 2019 – April 2020)

Established in 2016. Off Y Grid (OYG) is a partnership between seven cinemas in North Wales who are working collectively to promote British independent and international film, including home-grown Welsh content. The project is designed to reduce rural isolation through affordable, connected events, generating anticipation around film releases in North Wales.

In 2019, Off Y Grid will celebrate a number of key themes including Visit Wales’ Year of Discovery, the latest Welsh film releases and youth-led activities. They will build on the success of the pop-up cinema in Portmeirion, where audiences have no regular cinema provision and support a number of new collaborations in the North, such as Wicked Wales and Cell B around youth-led cinema.

Off Y Grid venues include Galeri, Caernarfon; Pontio, Bangor; CELLB, Blaenau Ffestiniog, Neuadd Dwyfor in Pwllheli, Dragon Theatre in Barmouth, TAPE in Old Colwyn and Neuadd Ogwen, Bethesda.

twitter.com/offygrid 

facebook.com/offygrid

73 Degree Community (5th September – 12th December 2019)

Sinema 73’ is a new community-led Cinema Club hosted in partnership with Ty Pawb in Wrexham. It has been established as an accessible club for film lovers in an area of North East Wales, where access to regular British and International cinema is otherwise limited. Every other Thursday from September to Christmas, Sinema 73 will screen a different film with a fun activity afterwards, from Q&As to live music performances. The programme is curated by a committee of dedicated film experts and members of local community groups. It features collaborative BAMER focused screenings with Watch Africa and Cinema Golau.

www.facebook.com/73degreefilms 

twitter.com/73degreefilms 

www.instagram.com/73degreefilms/ 

www.73degreefilms.com/ 

Dragon Theatre Barmouth: (21st June 2019 – March 2020)

Working with Gwynedd Arts as co-funders, Dragon Theatre will be organising a series of non-mainstream film and cross-arts events in Barmouth, drawing in new members of the community to enjoy their local cinema experience. Films such as Maiden, documenting the story of the first all-female Whitbread around the world Yacht race, will be explored with added value events for female audiences. Mainstream films will also be paired with B-movies to promote international cinema to the regular audience.

www.dragontheatre.co.uk/ 

www.facebook.com/dragontheatre/ 

twitter.com/DragonBarmouth 

TAPE: (June 2019-December 2019)

TAPE will launch their first inclusion film festival in 2019, in partnership with Diverse Cyrmu. With specialists on the scientific model of disability, to neurodiverse filmmakers, the event will support new voices, training and supported employment across North Wales. TAPE will also run two special pop-up programmes including a Chapel of Horror weekend at Conwy Chapel and a series of screenings at Gaol Cell Cinema in Ruthin, in partnership with the local film archive.

TAPE is a community arts charity which specialisted in bespoke, inclusive, person-led support for people of all ages. Since 2008, TAPE’s work has helped significant numbers of people to move out of isolated circumstances, find friends, build confidence and skills, move off benefits, enter further and higher education and training, and find employment.

tapemusicandfilm.co.uk/ 

twitter.com/tapeartscentre

www.facebook.com/TAPECommunityMusicandFilm

West 

Abertoir (19th – 24th November 2019)

The celebrated international horror film festival returns to Aberystwyth in November for six days of talks, guests, film with live commentary, educational presentations, Q&As with filmmakers, specially written articles, discussions, classic screenings and a selection of the newest films from major film festivals worldwide – all screening in Wales for the very first time. As the only UK representatives in the European Fantastic Film Festivals Federation, Abertoir attracts attendees from all parts of the UK to Wales each year. Highlights to look out for include a masterclass in practical special effects, in-depth career interviews with directors Norman J Warren and Gary Sherman, and a celebration of British actor Donald Pleasence in his centenary year.

www.abertoir.co.uk/ 

www.facebook.com/abertoir 

twitter.com/AbertoirFest

Wales One World (WOW) (September 2019 – April 2020)

Through their Global-Rural project, WOW are exploring the impact of globalisation on rural societies. Their World and Independent cinema programme for audiences living in rural west Wales will support local adults and young people with learning disabilities, in addition to refugee families, people living in rural/farming communities and Welsh speaking communities.  WOW work with a diverse range of community groups as part of a strategy to reach rural audiences and offer meeting ground for different groups to experience and discuss a variety of world cinema. The project aims to encourage debate and inspire communities by bringing rural audiences together to tackle isolation, foster common understanding and social cohesion.

www.wowfilmfestival.com/en/events

twitter.com/wowfilm 

www.facebook.com/WOWfilmfest/ 

Across Wales  

Watch Africa (October 2019 – July 2020)

Building on the first successful year of Watch Africa’s Film Club, which attracted over 300 people to screenings in both Wales and Africa, the Watch-Africa Festival are returning with a host of workshops, Q&As, masterclasses, live music and food across eight venues Wales wide. With African film accounting for just 2.56%2 of films screened across Wales, Watch Africa are working to improve the provision for African audiences in Wales by offering a regular film club, in addition to the main festival in October 2019.

watch-africa.co.uk

www.facebook.com/WatchAfricaCymru/

National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales (NSSAW)  (January – March 2020)

In partnership with The Welsh Books Council / Cyngor Llyfrau Cymru, NSSAW will create ‘Picturing Our Past / Fframio’n Gorffenol’, an enhanced e-book on the history of Wales on screen. It will be launched alongside a series of special screenings, celebrating Welsh heritage throughout Wales, linking recent Welsh releases to important Welsh films of the past.

www.library.wales/ 

twitter.com/NSSAW

Made in Wales

Film Hub Wales celebrate Welsh stories, language and culture year-round through Made in Wales, a strategy designed to promote films with Welsh connections. Upcoming activities include:

Shorts Bank (June 2019 – March 2020)

Working with partners across the Welsh screen industry, FHW will develop a catalogue of short films Made in Wales, which will complement the existing catalogue of over 130 features. As this will be the first catalogue of its kind, the project will improve access for exhibitors to Welsh talent and make it easier to celebrate shorts filmmaking Made in Wales. The project will be searchable upon launch of the Hub’s new website in 2019.

www.filmhubwales.org/films/made-wales 

Gwen (July – October 2019)

Following its release in July, Gwen is set to screen at eight cinemas across Wales this summer. Set in the stark beauty of 19th Century Snowdonia, during the industrial revolution, Gwen struggles with her mother’s mysterious illness, her father’s absence and a ruthless mining company encroaching on their land. A growing darkness begins to take grip of her home, and the suspicious local community turns on Gwen and her family. Screenings in Wales include:

Pontio, Bangor – 10th July

Chapter, Cardiff – 19th July

Showcase Nantgarw – 19th July

Aberystwyth Arts Centre – 19th July

Neaudd Dwyfor, Pwhelli – 19th July

Theatre Mwldan, Cardigan – 30th August

Theatre Colwyn – 2nd Sept

Sinema Sadwrn, Carmarthenshire – 2nd October

Further screenings to be announced.
www.bulldog-film.com/ 

Sinemaes (2nd – 10th August)

FHW are delighted to support Sinemaes in its fourth year at the National Eisteddfod of Wales, with a programme of archive film in partnership with The National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales. Events will feature a special celebration of pioneering Welsh filmmaker, Arthur Cheetham (1864 – 15 January 1937), with live accompaniment from Paul Shallcross and an introduction to reminiscence therapy through the National Library’s Living Memory project with FHW.

eisteddfod.wales/ 

Phoenix Ton Pentre (July – November 2019)

“Revisiting the past to understand the present and contribute to future local awareness.”

For the third year, Phoenix Ton Pentre are developing their year-round audience for Welsh stories on screen. Pairing archive with new releases and sharing their memories of Welsh film through the ages, they will continue to make people aware of their Welsh Film Heritage.

www.facebook.com/The-Phoenix-Ton-Pentre 

Wild Honey Pie! (14th June – 1st July)

A nationwide tour of Wales of the film Wild Honey Pie! and director Jamie Adams (+ cast). The roadshow will take place in key Welsh cinemas and exhibitors, spreading travel costs across the consortium, and enabling filmmaking talent to visit more communities.

Chapter, Cardiff – 14th, 15th and 16th June

Cinema & Co, Swansea – 20th June

Aberystwyth Arts Centre – 17th – 26th June

Savoy Cinema, Monmouth – 17th – 21st June

Galeri, Caernarfon – June TBC

pinpointpresents.com/wildhoneypie/cinema-listings/ 

The Dark Crystal at Cardiff Mini Film Festival (22nd and 23rd June)

Cardiff Mini Film Festival & Darkened Rooms present a special screening of The Dark Crystal in one of Cardiff’s most unique buildings, the Masonic Temple – followed by a Q&A with Welsh puppeteer Toby Philpott, also famously known for being half of Jabba the Hut. They’ll also be exploring Welsh culture further through a screening of Jon Jones’ latest release, Last Summer.

cardiffminifilmfestival.co.uk/

www.facebook.com/cardiffminifilm

twitter.com/cardiffminifilm

Further projects will be announced during 2019. For more information, or tickets to events, please contact:

Megan David, Marketing Officer, on 02920 311 067 / megan@filmhubwales.org (part time Tues-Thurs),

Lisa Nesbitt, Development Officer, on 02920 311 067 / lisa@filmhubwales.org,

Hana Lewis, Strategic Manager, on 02920 353 740 hana@filmhubwales.org,

DOWNLOAD THE PRESS RELEASE BELOW

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VACANCY: Film Hub Wales Marketing Post (part time) 2019 (CLOSED)
  • Film Hub Wales Marketing Officer (part-time, 24 hours pw)
  • Fixed-term contract to March 2022, subject to confirmation of annual funding
  • Salary scale: £21,500 pro rata

Film Hub Wales (FHW) aims to bring more films, to more people, in more places around Wales. Along with its independent member venues, FHW regularly develops inventive ways for people in Wales to go to the cinema. FHW is one of nine UK wide ‘hubs’ funded by the British Film Institute (BFI) to form the Film Audience Network (FAN), with Chapter appointed as the Film Hub Lead Organisation (FHLO) in Wales. The aim is to develop the exhibition sector through dedicated research, training and audience development project support. Since Film Hub Wales set up in 2013, it’s supported over 195  exciting cinema projects, reaching over 388,000 audience members.

The post will support Film Hub Wales with the development of audiences for British independent and world cinema across Wales, through targeted and innovative marketing of FHW and member projects, offering increased reach and new access to under-served groups.

  • Application forms and job description available to download below or contact Hana Lewis, Film Hub Wales Strategic manager hana@filmhubwales.org
  • Closing date for applications: 17:30, Wednesday 13th March
  • Interviews to be held: Wednesday 20th March

DOWNLOADS:

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Yasmin
Inclusive Cinema Placement 2018 (Yasmin Begum)

FAN Access Coordinator Yasmin Begum discusses her time at Film Hub Wales working on the Inclusive Cinema project.

It’s an exciting time to be working in film exhibition and programming. Programming in the United Kingdom is becoming more and more varied and diverse, from more discussions on inclusion, engagement down to more community programming.

I’ve spent the past three months working on British Film Institute’s flagship Inclusive Cinema scheme. It’s an initiative to promote equality, inclusion and diversity in the film sector. I’ve been based in Chapter Arts Centre at Film Hub Wales in Cardiff, a creative hub of the city and the largest art venue of its kind in Europe.

My time and work has been really varied at Inclusive Cinema. I’ve attended training, learned loads about areas I didn’t know about before and had the opportunity to attend screening days. I’ve enjoyed learning more about access and inclusion while in-post. One thing I’ve noticed working in the sector is how in a tighter funding climate that identities are sometimes pitched against each other. I’m proud to say that Inclusive Cinema champions an intersectional attitude and approach to working that looks at where we can join up work in new areas to ensure that nobody is left behind. Intersectionality is a framework that looks at how power impacts different groups in society to see how that power overlaps for different groups. I’m thrilled I have been able to work on information pages and highlight our shared similarities to make film exhibition and programming a better place for everyone.

A definite highlight of my time has been the events that Inclusive Cinema and Film Hub Wales has helped to deliver. In December, I was fortunate enough to give a Pecha Kucha presentation on the importance of intersectional approaches to film programming for audience development at the fantastic This Way Up Conference in Liverpool. Intersectionality is a tool for understanding the world around us, looking at power and how some groups are less likely to have power than others – or be subject to power. The next month I was in Scotland with Film Hub Scotland delivering Opening Our Doors, a day aimed at increasing the capacity of programmers and cinemas who are members of FHS. I’d never had an opportunity to programme like that and my heart soared to overhear attendees talk about new ways in which that want to make their venue more accessible for people from lower income communities.

There’s a quote by Audre Lorde (a self-described “black, lesbian, warrior mother poet”) which reads;

 “It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognise, accept and celebrate those differences”.

I’ve thought about this a tremendous amount when considering exhibition and programming in the UK. Who programmes what? And for whom? And who can afford it? These are the questions that go through my head. I feel for far too long that our inability to discuss topics relating to equality and inclusion has divided us and resulted in a myth of meritocracy.

The UK is small. The sector’s even smaller. It’s time to act to both set and promote good practice in the industry to not only support exhibitors, but equality and diversity in film overall at every level including filmmakers, screenwriters etc. I’d never really understood BFI, what it did, what its remit was or how it affected the communities I come from. Now I know and I’m excited to see BFI champion equality and diversity as it goes from strength to strength. Inclusive Cinema is a step towards recognising, accepting those differences to help support the sector and I look forward to seeing it thrive.

 

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Film Hub Wales - Last Summer
Discover Your Local Cinema in 2019 as Year of Discovery reaches Screens Wales Wide

Discover Your Local Cinema in 2019 as
Year of Discovery reaches Screens Wales Wide

2019 is the Year of Discovery, led by Visit Wales. Think adventure, culture, landscape and memorable experiences. Think cinema.

Film Hub Wales (FHW), with Chapter as Hub Lead Organisation, are working with Welsh venues to celebrate what makes Wales unique and to take audiences on a cinematic journey of discovery.

Throughout 2019, audiences can connect with Welsh culture and landscapes, from the sweeping hills of 19th Century Snowdonia, in new release ‘Gwen,’ to an enhanced E-book on the history of Wales on screen. They’ll also get a chance to see some discovery themed favourites from Film Hub Wales’ specially curated programme pack

Hana Lewis, Strategic Manager or Film Hub Wales explains:

“Visit Wales’ themes of discovery, from journeys to adventure, culture and landscape lend themselves to the visual power and imagination of film. There are boundless possibilities for audiences to experience something new, whether they are discovering their local cinema for the first time, or re-connecting.

From film screenings at the congress of Celtic studies, to a tour of new Welsh release Gwen, which is bursting with vivid Welsh landscapes, we’ll be celebrating many of things that make Wales unique on screen.”

Philip Hoile, Head of Distribution, Bulldog Film Distribution added:

“We’re proud to have Gwen included in Year of Discovery. It’s a film showcasing the stark and stunning Snowdonian landscapes within its rich gothic atmosphere as well as presenting the story of a young girl during a complicated part of Welsh history that is ripe for discussion. We hope that many people will discover this fantastic film in Welsh cinemas across the rest of the year.”

The projects are supported by Film Hub Wales, part of the BFI Film Audience Network, using funds from the National Lottery to ensure the greatest choice of cinema is available to everyone across the UK.

2019 Projects

South Wales

Wales One World (WOW)

September 2019 – April 2020

Through their Global-Rural project, WOW are exploring the impact of globalisation on rural societies along The Coastal Way[1]. They will be bringing Welsh made shorts, animations and archive films to audiences in rural West Wales.

Their world and Independent cinema programme for rural audiences will support local adults and young people with learning disabilities, in addition to refugee families, people living in rural/farming communities and Welsh speaking communities.  WOW work with a diverse range of community groups as part of a strategy to reach rural audiences and offer meeting ground for different groups to experience and discuss a variety of world cinema. The project aims to encourage debate and inspire communities by bringing rural audiences together to tackle isolation, foster common understanding and social cohesion.

wowfilmfestival.com/en/events
twitter.com/wowfilm
facebook.com/WOWfilmfest/

 

Pontardawe

12th September

Ray and Liz, the debut film from award winning, Swansea based, photographer Richard Billingham, and Welsh Producer Jacqui Davies, will be screened at Pontardawe Arts Centre, in conversation with the filmmakers. Autobiographic in nature, Billingham, returns to the striking photographs of his family during Thatcher-era Britain and his upbringing on the outskirts of Birmingham.

npttheatres.co.uk/pontardawe/
facebook.com/PontardaweArtsCentre/

 

North Wales

Off Y Grid

May 2019 – April 2020

Welcoming isolated audiences in to venues across the The North Wales Way throughout 2019, seven ‘Off Y Grid’ cinemas will celebrate Wales’ ancient language and landscapes.

Newly released Welsh folk tale, Gwen, set during the industrial revolution, will screen alongside a series of Welsh short films at the International Congress of Celtic Studies at Bangor University, Wales, on 22–26 July 2019. The conference represents an international gathering of scholars researching the languages, literatures and cultural traditions of the Celtic-speaking peoples, held once every four years. Newly released Welsh period film Last Summer is also currently screening in a number of venues.

From the slate mountains of Blaenau Ffestiniog to the beaches of Rhyl, Cell B and Wicked Wales will be reconnecting family audiences with well-known Welsh made programmes such as Superted and Gelert, including a collaborative ‘Films in the Forest’ event in October. New audiences will also discover cinema as Off Y Grid pops-up in unusual spaces and places.

Established in 2016. Off Y Grid (OYG) is a partnership between seven venues in North Wales who are working collectively to promote British independent and international film, including home-grown Welsh content. The project is designed to reduce rural isolation through affordable, connected events, generating anticipation around film releases in North Wales.  Off Y Grid venues include Galeri, Caernarfon; Pontio, Bangor; CELLB, Blaenau Ffestiniog, Neuadd Dwyfor in Pwllheli, Dragon Theatre in Barmouth, TAPE in Old Colwyn and Neuadd Ogwen, Bethesda.

twitter.com/offygrid
facebook.com/offygrid
Promotional trailer: https://vimeo.com/223606421

TAPE

June 2019-December 2019

TAPE will launch their first inclusion film festival in old Colwyn during 2019, combining the beauty of the North Wales way with local filmmaking culture, for visitors. The event will support new voices from across communities and incorporate signposting towards training and employment across North Wales. This includes the premiere of Paul & the Undersea Critters, a debut live action, animated, short from local Welsh animator Shane Howard.

TAPE will also celebrate some of North Wales’ historic architecture, with special pop-up screenings including a Chapel of Horror weekend at Conwy Chapel and a series of screenings at their Gaol Cell Cinema in Ruthin, in partnership with the Denbighshire Archive Service.

TAPE is a community arts charity which specialises in bespoke, inclusive, person-led support for people of all ages. Since 2008, TAPE’s work has helped significant numbers of people to move out of isolated circumstances, find friends, build confidence and skills, move off benefits, enter further and higher education and training, and find employment.

tapemusicandfilm.co.uk/ 
twitter.com/tapeartscentre
acebook.com/TAPECommunityMusicandFilm

West

 

Abertoir International Horror Festival

19th – 24th November 2019

As the only UK representatives in the European Fantastic Film Festivals Federation and a firm favourite on Wales’ cultural calendar, Abertoir attracts tourists from across the UK to the West coast of Wales each November. Audiences can engage with talks, guests, film with live commentary, educational presentations, Q&As with filmmakers, specially written articles, discussions, classic screenings and a selection of the newest films from major film festivals worldwide – all screening in Wales for the very first time, against the picturesque coastal landscape of Aberystwyth.

Highlights to look out for include a masterclass in practical special effects, in-depth career interviews with directors Norman J Warren and Gary Sherman, and a celebration of British actor Donald Pleasence in his centenary year.

abertoir.co.uk/
facebook.com/abertoir
twitter.com/AbertoirFest

 

 

Across Wales

Gwen

July – October 2019
In celebration of the release of Welsh folk tale, Gwen, which is full of brooding Welsh landscapes during the industrial revolution, we will be offering specially commissioned programme notes by poet and cultural critic Ben Gwalchmai. 16 venues across Wales will screen the film from July onwards. Topics will cover Welsh culture ancient and new; Cumbric & Cymraeg, contemporary tenant farmers, rewilding and the changing colours of the quarries and mountains. Screenings in Wales include:

  • Chapter, Cardiff – 8th July (Q&A) 19th – 25th July
  • Pontio, Bangor (Q&A) – 10th July and August TBC
  • Showcase Nantgarw – 19th July
  • Aberystwyth Arts Centre – 11th July (with Q&A) 19th, 20th, 22nd & 24th July
  • Neaudd Dwyfor, Pwhelli – 19th – 24th July
  • Showcase Nantgarw – 19th July
  • Neuadd Ogwen, Bethesda – 19th July
  • VUE Swansea – 19th July
  • Odeon, Cardiff – 19th – 26th July
  • Odeon, Swansea – 19th – 26th July
  • Odeon, Bridgend – 19th – 26th July
  • Odeon, Wrexham – 23rd July
  • Odeon, Llanelli – 23rd July
  • Memo Arts, Barry – 2nd August
  • Theatre Mwldan, Cardigan – 30th August – 2nd September
  • Theatre Colwyn – 2nd Sept
  • Taliesin, Swansea – 18th Sept
  • Canolfan S4C Yr Egin – 2nd September
  • Sinema Sadwrn, Carmarthenshire – 25th October, with Welsh short ‘Neckface’
  • Magic Lantern dates TBC

Further screenings to be announced.
www.gwenfilm.com

 

National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales (NSSAW)

January – March 2020

In partnership with The Welsh Books Council / Cyngor Llyfrau Cymru and Thud Media, NSSAW will create ‘Picturing Our Past / Fframio’n Gorffennol’, an enhanced e-book enabling audiences to discover the history of Wales on screen. Celebrating both culture and landscapes, it will be launched alongside a series of special screenings, celebrating Welsh heritage throughout Wales, linking recent Welsh releases to important Welsh films of the past. Pivotal films such as ‘Y Chwarelwr’ and ‘Un Bore Mercher’ will explore Wales’ ancient language and community on screen, alongside archive film treasures recently unearthed through the BFI’s Unlocking Film Heritage project.

library.wales/
twitter.com/NSSAW

 

Shorts Bank

June 2019 – March 2020

Working with partners across the Welsh screen industry, FHW will develop a catalogue of short films Made in Wales, which will complement the existing catalogue of over 130 features. As this will be the first catalogue of its kind, the project will improve access for exhibitors to Welsh talent and make it easier to celebrate shorts filmmaking Made in Wales and enable audiences to discover Welsh culture, language and landscapes through short filmmaking. The project will be searchable upon launch of the Hub’s new website in 2019.

filmhubwales.org/films/made-wales

 

Phoenix Ton Pentre

July – November 2019

“Revisiting the past to understand the present and contribute to future local awareness. “

Phoenix Ton Pentre are developing local audiences for Welsh stories on screen, exploring the sweeping summer landscapes of Pembrokeshire through Jon Jones’ new release Last Summer and revisiting the urban streets of Swansea in cult classic, Twin Town. Films will be screened with archive shorts, connecting landscape to memories of Welsh heritage through the ages.

facebook.com/The-Phoenix-Ton-Pentre

Further projects will be announced during 2019. Please note that films are subject to change.

For images please copy and paste the following link into your browser:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1YvOGdfNhcgy_6NTbccQC9mfD0B1WseJd?usp=sharing

For more information, or tickets to events, please contact:

Megan David, Marketing Officer, on 02920 311 067 / megan@filmhubwales.org (part time Tues-Thurs),
Lisa Nesbitt, Development Officer, on 02920 311 067 / lisa@filmhubwales.org,
Hana Lewis, Strategic Manager, on 02920 353 740 hana@filmhubwales.org,

 

NOTES TO EDITORS:
ABOUT FILM HUB WALES:

Film Hub Wales aims to bring more films, to more people, in more places around Wales. Along with its independent member venues, FHW regularly develops inventive ways for people in Wales to go to the cinema.

Film Hub Wales (FHW) is one of eight UK wide ‘hubs’ funded by the BFI (British Film Institute) to form the Film Audience Network (FAN), with Chapter appointed as the Film Hub Lead Organisation (FHLO) in Wales. We aim to develop the exhibition sector through dedicated research, training and audience development project support. Since Film Hub Wales set up in 2013, we’ve supported over 195 exciting cinema projects, reaching over 420,000 audience members.

In partnership with our member cinemas, arts centres, community venues, societies, festivals and wider film practitioners, FHW aims to celebrate and support the vibrant cultural film sector here in Wales, working together to expand and increase choice for audiences, regardless of where they live.

filmhubwales.org
twitter.com/FilmHubWales 

facebook.com/filmhubwales
ABOUT THE BFI

The BFI is the lead body for film in the UK with the ambition to create a flourishing film environment in which innovation, opportunity and creativity can thrive by:

  1. Connecting audiences to the widest choice of British and World cinema
  2. Preserving and restoring the most significant film collection in the world for today and future generations
  3. Championing emerging and world class film makers in the UK – investing in creative, distinctive and entertaining work
  4. Promoting British film and talent to the world
  5. Growing the next generation of filmmakers and audiences

The BFI is a Government arm’s-length body and distributor of Lottery funds for film. The BFI serves a public role which covers the cultural, creative and economic aspects of film in the UK. It delivers this role:

  1. As the UK-wide organisation for film, a charity core funded by Government
  2. By providing Lottery and Government funds for film across the UK
  3. By working with partners to advance the position of film in the UK.

Founded in 1933, the BFI is a registered charity governed by Royal Charter.

The BFI Board of Governors is chaired by Josh Berger CBE.

 

ABOUT THE BFI FILM AUDIENCE NETWORK

Film Hub Wales is a lead film hub partner in the BFI Film Audience Network.

The BFI Film Audience Network (FAN) is a ground-breaking initiative that gives audiences across the UK the opportunity to see a broader range of films in a cinema setting. For filmmakers, getting films onto cinema screens is a highly competitive business, particularly for specialised films which includes archive, documentary, independent and foreign language films.

With £12 million of Lottery funding over four years (2018-22) the BFI FAN works with cinema exhibitors, film festivals, educators, film societies, community venues, film archives and other organisations in their regions or nations to boost audiences for film across the UK.

The film hub partners which drive audience engagement across the UK comprise:  Broadway Cinema, Nottingham with Flatpack, Birmingham; Chapter, Cardiff;; Film London; Queen’s Film Theatre, Belfast; Glasgow Film; the Independent Cinema Office (for the South East); Showroom Sheffield in partnership with HOME, Manchester & Tyneside Cinema; and Watershed, Bristol.

About the Wales Way

The Wales Way is a new family of three national routes that lead you into the heart of real Wales:

  • The Coastal Way travels the west coast around Cardigan Bay, a 180-mile (290km) road-trip between the sea and mountains.
  • The Cambrian Way crosses the spine of Wales for 185 miles (300km) between Llandudno and Cardiff, through National Parks and big green spaces.
  • The North Wales Way leads 75 miles (120km) past mighty castles into the island of Anglesey.

[1] See end notes for definition of Visit Wales’ The Wales Way.

Discover Your Local Cinema in 2019 as
Year of Discovery reaches Screens Wales Wide

2019 is the Year of Discovery, led by Visit Wales. Think adventure, culture, landscape and memorable experiences. Think cinema.

Film Hub Wales (FHW), with Chapter as Hub Lead Organisation, are working with Welsh venues to celebrate what makes Wales unique and to take audiences on a cinematic journey of discovery.

Throughout 2019, audiences can connect with Welsh culture and landscapes, from the sweeping hills of 19th Century Snowdonia, in new release ‘Gwen,’ to an enhanced E-book on the history of Wales on screen. They’ll also get a chance to see some discovery themed favourites from Film Hub Wales’ specially curated programme pack

Hana Lewis, Strategic Manager or Film Hub Wales explains:
Visit Wales’ themes of discovery, from journeys to adventure, culture and landscape lend themselves to the visual power and imagination of film. There are boundless possibilities for audiences to experience something new, whether they are discovering their local cinema for the first time, or re-connecting.

From film screenings at the congress of Celtic studies, to a tour of new Welsh release Gwen, which is bursting with vivid Welsh landscapes, we’ll be celebrating many of things that make Wales unique on screen.

 

Philip Hoile, Head of Distribution, Bulldog Film Distribution added:

“We’re proud to have Gwen included in Year of Discovery. It’s a film showcasing the stark and stunning Snowdonian landscapes within its rich gothic atmosphere as well as presenting the story of a young girl during a complicated part of Welsh history that is ripe for discussion. We hope that many people will discover this fantastic film in Welsh cinemas across the rest of the year.”

The projects are supported by Film Hub Wales, part of the BFI Film Audience Network, using funds from the National Lottery to ensure the greatest choice of cinema is available to everyone across the UK.

Download the Full Press Release:

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Year of Indigenous Languages
Indigenous Languages Celebrated across Cinema Screens in Wales

Indigenous Languages Celebrated across Cinema Screens in Wales

Film Hub Wales (FHW), with Chapter as Hub Lead Organisation, are working with cinemas and film festivals across Wales to explore critically important themes of development, peace building and reconciliation on screen in 2019, during the United Nation’s International Year of Indigenous languages (IYIL2019).

Languages play a crucial role in the daily lives of people, not only as a tool for communication, education, social integration and development but also as a repository for each person’s unique identity, cultural history, traditions and memory. Despite their immense value, languages around the world continue to disappear at an alarming rate.

In celebration of IY2019, Welsh exhibitors have developed film programmes that raise the international profile of the Welsh language, along with the languages of some of the largest international communities that form audiences in Wales.

Hana Lewis, Film Hub Wales’ Strategic Manager explains:
“There are many multi-cultural communities in Wales, speaking a variety of Indigenous languages from Polish to Chinese, African dialects, or the Welsh language itself. Film is an ideal tool to raise awareness of those communities who protect and preserve those languages. It is also essential that we appreciate the important cultural contribution these languages make worldwide.

With over 15 film releases weekly and 54% of those releases originating from outside of the USA or UK, there are many cultures and unseen voices to discover. We are excited to support our partners in Wales as they celebrate languages spoken both locally and across the world.”

 

Ms Audrey Azoulay, Director-General of Unesco added during the global launch event of IYIL2019 on 27 January 2019 in Paris at Unesco:
“This International Year will provide an opportunity to strengthen our efforts with regard to culture, information and communication (..). We must go further in the promotion of multilingualism in the media and in online content.”

Emyr Williams, Cinema Coordinator at Pontio Bangor adds:
“When thinking about a project to work on for IYIL there was a desire to do something quite different. Much of the regular film programming work here in Pontio is done in order to normalise the Welsh language, have Welsh language films slot into the wider programme, have events and talks in Welsh in the same way as we would have with an English director touring independent cinemas, so initially I was resistant to highlighting this ‘language’ issue with regards to cinema. Then I thought about Paul Eastwood’s recent short film/artwork DYFODIAITH and knew that programming this was the obvious answer to my worries about artificially highlighting the language.  Paul’s work is cinematic and very accessible and most importantly is concerned with the whole question of ‘indigenous’ language – its existence, how it evolves and how it survives.  Giving up half an hour of your time to step onto a strange isolated island where your normal everyday language has mutated into something unfamiliar and wonderful is an excellent way to celebrate IYIL.”

The projects are supported by Film Hub Wales, part of the BFI Film Audience Network (FAN) using funds from the National Lottery to ensure the greatest choice of cinema is available to everyone across the UK

Upcoming Projects:

North Wales:

TOKYO TALES
Pontio (Bangor) 13th – 19th June
Discover the cinema of two master Japanese filmmakers Yasujiro Ozu and Hirokazu Kore-Eda with a short season of classics at Pontio, Bangor. Following the release of Oscar nominated Shoplifters, there is a chance to see Kore-eda’s remastered debut, Maborosi. Ozu’s Tokyo Story also is regularly voted among the best films ever made and an Autumn Afternoon, his final film in colour.

Dyfodiath
Pontio (Bangor) 23rd July
Imagine a future world and society where Welsh and the other Brythonic languages have survived and developed in splendid isolation. Dyfodiath’s imagery forces us to contemplate our reaction to this possible future for our language. A bold, brilliant and accessible work of cinematic art will be presented with Q&A with Paul Eastwood and Llyr Titus along with a special printed booklet containing new writings about the work. Audiences can also enjoy new Welsh release, Gwen with a selection of Welsh language shorts.

pontio.co.uk/Online/
twitter.com/PontioTweets
facebook.com/PontioBangor/

Off Y Grid
(22-26th July)

Newly released Welsh folk tale, Gwen, which has its preview at Pontio on the 10th July in partnership with Bafta Cymru, will screen alongside a series of Welsh short films at the International Congress of Celtic Studies at Bangor University. The conference represents an international gathering of scholars researching the languages, literatures and cultural traditions of the Celtic-speaking peoples, held once every four years.

(26th September TBC)
Off Y Grid venues will screen up to 10 multilingual films such as Gadael Lenin, in connection with European Language Day; The Council of Europe’s initiative designed to encourage 800 million European’s across 47 states to discover more languages at any age alongside their studies.

Established in 2016. Off Y Grid is a partnership between seven venues in North Wales who are working collectively to promote British independent and international film, including home-grown Welsh content. The project is designed to reduce rural isolation through affordable, connected events, generating anticipation around film releases in North Wales. Off Y Grid venues include Galeri, Caernarfon; Pontio, Bangor; CELLB, Blaenau Ffestiniog, Neuadd Dwyfor in Pwllheli, Dragon Theatre in Barmouth, TAPE in Old Colwyn and Neuadd Ogwen, Bethesda.

twitter.com/offygrid
facebook.com/offygrid

 

South Wales:

Watch Africa
(25th July TBC)
Discover Kinyarwanda, the dialect of the Rwanda-Rundi language spoken by at least 12 million people in Rwanda at this screening of Sacred Water at Chapter Arts Centre, Cardiff. The film explores the evolution of Kunyaza, a culture of feminine pleasure, where female orgasm is a matter of honor for men. British born author and historian of Nigerian descent; Habeeb Aikande, who has six published books on race, sex & relationships, and Islam will lead a Q&A around the importance of culture in shaping family and community structures especially in areas of sexuality and rights of passage.

(25th July)
1958 Arabic crime drama, Cairo Station (Bab el Hadid) will be screened at the Gates Arts Centre in Cardiff. Banned for 12 years in his own country, Youssef Chahine’s searing depiction of sexual obsession will be accessible to local audiences with a special Q&A, which explores the political and social changes taking place in Egypt at the time of the film’s production.

The screenings are part of Watch Africa’s Film Club, improving the provision for African audiences in Wales in addition to the annual festival in October 2019.

watch-africa.co.uk
facebook.com/WatchAfricaCymru/

Snowcat Cinema at Penarth Pier Pavillion
(Dates TBC)
Snowcat will be exploring different indigenous languages through four distinct film events.

The Edge Of The Knife (SGaawaay K’uuna 2018) is the 19th century story of two families on their annual fishing retreat in the far removed island of Haida Gwaii, a remote archipelago of Canada. Haida has been spoken for at least 14,000 years but is no only known to be used by 20 individuals.

Set among the pastoral Gaddi community in Himachal Pradesh and made in the Gaddi dialect is The Gold Laden Sheep & The Sacred Mountain (2018). The film tells the s adventures of elderly shepherd and his assistant who live on a remote unknown mountain. When news spreads of a plane crash, along with stories about the gold and silver aboard the aircraft, they set out on a life-altering journey.

Combining ancient ArmenianAzerbaijani and Georgian dialects, The Colour Of Pomegranates is a super-stylized, surreal biographical drama made in the Soviet Union in 1969. It follows Armenian troubadour Sayat Nova, whose life is depicted through non-narrative amalgamations of poetic images and language.

snowcatcinema.co.uk/
twitter.com/SnowcatCinema
facebook.com/snowcatcinema/

Gentle/Radical
(June 2019 – March 2020)
Gentle/Radical ensure that the voices of those most marginalised, are heard through the presentation of powerful cinema. Going Deeper, Going Local is the first project to launch at their new base at the Wyndham Street Centre community hub, in Riverside, Cardiff. Reaching out to minority ethnic audiences encompassing BAME women, BAME elders and BAME youth in both hyper-localised settings and across Cardiff, the project will explore how audiences are impacted by issues such as climate change, migration, housing, food justice, colonialism, and other experiences of structural oppression and injustice.

As part of Going Deeper, Going Local, in particular they are looking forward to screening Merata: How Mum Decolonised The Screen. Pioneering Maori filmmaker Merata Mita is the subject of this documentary, made by her son, Heperi Mita, a film that is a brilliant insight into the indigenous politics of New Zealand, and a portrait of a radical, trailblazing campaigner for indigenous and women’s rights.

Formed in 2017, Gentle/Radical is a grassroots cultural organisation and platform for radical thinking, creative practice and social change. They are currently running an online fundraiser to house their new cultural and community hub.

twitter.com/gentle_hq
.facebook.com/gentleradical/
gentleradical.org/

Phoenix Ton Pentre
(July – November 2019)
“Revisiting the past to understand the present and contribute to future local awareness.”

Phoenix Ton Pentre are developing local audiences for Welsh stories on screen, exploring the sweeping summer landscapes of Pembrokeshire through Jon Jones’ new release Last Summer and revisiting the urban streets of Swansea in cult classic, Twin Town. Films will be screened with archive shorts, connecting landscape to memories of Welsh heritage through the ages.

facebook.com/The-Phoenix-Ton-Pentre

Abergavenny Film Society
(4th December 20219)
The longest running film society in Wales have shown films from around the world, to audiences in Abergavenny, since 1978. New drama; Birds of Passage (Pájaros de verano), in the Wayuu or Goajiro language, is set during the marijuana bonanza, a violent decade that saw the origins of drug trafficking in columbia. It follows Rapayet and his indigenous family fight to control the business that ends up destroying their lives and culture. Wayuu is spoken by 305,000 indigenous Wayuu people in northwestern Venezuela and northeastern Colombia on the Guajira Peninsula.

abergavennyfilmsociety.com/index.html

The Italian Film Festival
(14th – 17th November)
The Italian Film Festival Cardiff brings to the screens of Wales a dynamic and diverse portrait of contemporary Italy with its beauty, complexity and contradictions. The selection of cutting edge films feature all genres of Italian cinematography with a strong emphasis on new narrative forms and independent productions. During the past three years the Festival has become a lively space for directors, actors and producers from both sides of the Channel. The Italian Film Festival Cardiff aspires to be a part of Wales’ increasingly international artistic profile.

iffc.wales/
twitter.com/_IFFC
facebook.com/ItalianFilmFestivalCardiff/

Chapter, Cardiff
(23rd August +Q&A, 30th August and 5th September)
Chapter, Cardiff are offering a special screening of Bait, set in a Cornish fishing village where the way of life is threatened. Offering many parallels to Welsh life, the screening on the 23rd August will include Q&A from the film’s Director, Mark Jenkin and Welsh musician Gwenno Saunders who recently released her first album in Cornish. The music, which features in Bait, is sung in the Kerneweg language, offering opportunity to explore the cultural connections between Wales and Cornwall.

(2nd – 8th August)
From the Director of the lunchbox, Photograph follows a struggling street photographer Rafi works day and night to pay off an old family debt. Pressured to marry by his grandmother, he convinces a shy stranger to pose as his fiancée. The pair develop a connection that transforms them in ways they could not expect. Beautifully shot on the streets of Mumbai with Hindi and Gujarati dialects.

https://www.chapter.org/
https://www.facebook.com/chapterarts
https://twitter.com/chaptertweets

 

Wales wide:

National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales (NSSAW)
(January – March 2020)
In partnership with The Welsh Books Council / Cyngor Llyfrau Cymru and Thud Media, NSSAW are starting development of ‘Picturing Our Past / Fframio’n Gorffennol’, an enhanced e-book enabling audiences to discover the history of Wales on screen. It will be launched alongside a series of screenings, celebrating Welsh heritage and language throughout Wales, linking recent Welsh releases to important Welsh films of the past. Pivotal films such as ‘Y Chwarelwr’ and ‘Un Bore Mercher’ will explore Wales’ ancient language and community on screen, alongside archive film treasures recently unearthed through the BFI’s Unlocking Film Heritage project.

library.wales/
twitter.com/NSSAW

Shorts Bank
(June 2019 – March 2020)
Working with partners across the Welsh screen industry, FHW will develop a catalogue of short films Made in Wales, which will complement the existing catalogue of over 130 features. As this will be the first catalogue of its kind, the project will improve access for exhibitors to Welsh talent and make it easier to celebrate shorts filmmaking Made in Wales and enable audiences to discover Welsh culture and language through short filmmaking. The project will be searchable upon launch of the Hub’s new website in 2019.

filmhubwales.org/films/made-wales
For images please copy and paste the following link into your browser
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1AY5m3uOVEvBt3pXh8UNueE00IqwJHPJl

For more information, or tickets to events, please contact:

  1. Megan David, Marketing Officer, on 02920 311 067 / megan@filmhubwales.org (part time Tues-Thurs),
  2. Lisa Nesbitt, Development Officer, on 02920 311 067 / lisa@filmhubwales.org,
  3. Hana Lewis, Strategic Manager, on 02920 353 740 hana@filmhubwales.org,

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